‘”Me Write Myself”: The Free Aboriginal Inhabitants of Van Diemen’s Land at Wybalenna, 1832–47’

Congratulations to Leonie Stevens on the publication this book, which allows the men, women and children exiled to Wybalenna settlement on Flinders Island in the 1830s and 1840s speak for themselves, through words found in items in the Flinders Island Chronicle, sermons, letters and petitions. In doing so, it reveals a politically astute community engaged in a Read more …

‘Colonialism and Its Aftermath: A History of Aboriginal South Australia’

Congratulations to Peggy Brock and Tom Gara on this edited collection, which traces the on-going impact of colonialism on Aboriginal individuals, communities and cultures, the disruptions and displacements it has caused, and Aboriginal responses to these challenges. It includes a series of regional histories interspersed with Aboriginal life stories. Contributors include AHA members Peggy Brock, Read more …

‘Memory, Place and Aboriginal-Settler History: Understanding Australians’ Consciousness of the Colonial Past’

Congratulations to Skye Krichauff on the publication her new book, which takes the absence of Aboriginal people in South Australian settler descendants’ historical consciousness as a starting point, then combines the methodologies and theories of historical enquiry, anthropology and memory studies to investigate the many intertwined ways the colonial past is known. The book is Read more …

‘Gugu Badhun: People of the Valley of Lagoons ‘

Congratulations to Yvonne Cadet-James, Robert Andrew James, Sue McGinty and Russell McGregor on the publication of this innovative book which bridges historical scholarship and Aboriginal oral tradition to tell the story of the Gugu Badhun people from the upper Burdekin River in North Queensland. It offers new insights into Aboriginal–European interactions and new understandings of Read more …

‘Hidden in Plain View’

Congratulations to Paul Irish. His new book, to be published in May 2017. The book shows that although they were often ignored in colonial narratives, local Aboriginal people did not lose their culture and die out within decades of Governor Phillip’s arrival in Sydney in 1788. Rather, they maintained a strong bond with the coast and its Read more …

‘Photography, Humanitarianism, Empire’

Congratulations to Jane Lydon, whose new book Photography, Humanitarianism, Empire (Bloomsbury) explores how photographs, with their power to create a sense of proximity and empathy, have long been a crucial means of exchanging ideas between people across the globe. Focusing on Australian experience in a global context, the book offers a rich selection of case studies to Read more …

Contesting Australian History: Festschrift in honour of Professor Marilyn Lake

This festschrift event is in celebration of Marilyn Lake’s scholarship and teaching and her contributions to different university communities and the Australian Historical Association, and her much valued friendship and collegiality over many years. The themes of the two day event will include: international history from an Australian perspective; histories of feminism; engaging America: US Read more …

‘The Land is Our History: Indigeneity, Law, and the Settler State’

Congratulations to Miranda Johnson on the recent publication of her book. It tells the story of Indigenous legal activism at a critical juncture in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, as these three countries sought out new postcolonial identities in the Asia-Pacific region. The book examines how Indigenous peoples opened up the space of law for the recognition Read more …

‘Gurindji Blues Postscript’

Charlie Ward, who researched the history of the Gurindji communities of Kalkaringi and Daguragu for his book, A Handful of Sand, describes his discoveries about the Gurindji Walk-off and its aftermath: official spying programs, conflicted activists, fabricated biographies and the second, failed Gurindji Walk-off from Wave Hill.