‘Migrant Nation: Australian Culture, Society and Identity’

Congratulations to Paul Longley Arthur, editor of the recently published Migrant Nation: Australian Culture, Society and Identity, a collection that focuses on particular historical blind spots by telling stories of individuals and groups that did not fit the favoured identity mould. The essays in this book work within the gap between Australian image and experience Read more …

‘The Scots in Australia, 1788–1938’

Congratulations to Benjamin Wilkie on the publication of The Scots in Australia, 1788–1938, which illuminates the many experiences of Scots in Australia from the first colonists in the late-eighteenth century until the hopeful arrivals of the interwar years. It looks at reasons for migration, their new lives and roles, and their encounters with – and Read more …

Honest History update

The Honest History website has had new material added: review by Ben Wilkie of Bain Attwood’s The Good Country; appreciation by John Shield of Don Charlwood’s 1965 classic, All the Green Year; Phil Cashen on the second conscription referendum, 1917, in Gippsland; the new Australian Journeyproject at the National Museum of Australia (hosted by Bruce Scates and Susan Read more …

2018 Australia Day Honours

The AHA offers its warm congratulations to the historians recognised with awards in the 2018 Australia Day Honours. Long time AHA member and former president Professor Marilyn Lake was awarded an AO for distinguished service to higher education as an academic, researcher, and author across a range of historical issues, and recognised for her contributions Read more …

‘Settlers, War, and Empire in the Press: Unsettling News in Australia and Britain, 1863–1902’

Congratulations to Sam Hutchinson on the publication of his new book, which explores how public commentary framed Australian involvement in the Waikato War (1863-64), the Sudan crisis (1885), and the South African War (1899-1902), a succession of conflicts that reverberated around the British Empire and which the newspaper press reported at length. In doing so, the Read more …

‘Truth’s Fool: Derek Freeman and the War over Cultural Anthropology’

Congratulations to Peter Hempenstall on the publication of his new book, which explores how New Zealand anthropologist Derek Freeman ignited a ferocious controversy in 1983 when he denounced the research of Margaret Mead, a world-famous public intellectual who had died five years earlier. Freeman’s claims caught the attention of popular media, converging with other vigorous cultural Read more …