Acknowledge No Frontier: The Creation and Demise of New Zealand’s Provinces, 1853–76

André Brett’s Acknowledge No Frontier: The Creation and Demise of New Zealand’s Provinces, 1853–76 (Otago University Press) examines a formative but largely forgotten era of New Zealand’s history. It is an account of the evolution of individual provinces and the central government’s use of public works, especially railways, to gain support for their abolition and Read more …

‘Victorian Margins’: AVSA at AHA 2016

‘Victorian Margins’ is the theme of the Australasian Victorian Studies Association (AVSA) affiliated conference stream at AHA 2016. The keynote speaker will be Professor Joseph Bristow (UCLA) on ‘Homosexual Blackmail in the 1890s’, drawing on research for his new study of Oscar Wilde’s two criminal trials. This event is a welcome opportunity for AVSA members Read more …

AHA member awarded 2016 Merewether Scholarship

Peter Hobbins has been awarded the 2016 Merewether Scholarship by the State Library of New South Wales for his project ‘Curios and curiosity: James Bray and the sunset of amateur science in colonial Sydney’. In extending the themes detailed in his 2013 University of Sydney doctoral thesis, Peter will use the Merewether Scholarship to explore Read more …

AHA member shortlisted for 2015 NSW Premier’s Literary Award Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-fiction

Philip Dwyer was shortlisted for the 2015 NSW Premier’s Literary Award Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-fiction for his book Citizen Emperor: Napoleon in Power 1799-1815 (Bloomsbury, 2014). The judges described it as ‘a monumental feat of scholarship, an absorbing portrait of a deeply ambitious and deeply flawed man, and brilliant account of a towering figure Read more …

Settler Colonial Governance in Nineteenth-Century Victoria

Leigh Boucher and Lynette Russell’s edited collection Settler Colonial Governance in Nineteenth-Century Victoria (ANU Press, 2015) is a serious re-examination of existing work on the Aboriginal history of nineteenth-century Victoria, deploying the insights of postcolonial thought to wrench open the inner workings of territorial expropriation and its historically tenacious variability.