‘Stories from the Sandstone: Quarantine Inscriptions from Australia’s Immigrant Past’

Congratulations to Peter Hobbins, Ursula K. Frederick and Anne Clarke on the publication of their book which combines intensive archaeological investigation and historical research to illuminate Australia’s past through often evocative quarantine inscriptions. The book draws upon historical records, diaries and other writings, to highlight the dramatic effects of diseases and discover where the authors of Read more …

Talking about Translation: History, Art and Language

In association with the ‘Moving Tongues’ exhibition, this panel talk will bring together Melbourne-based artists and writers from diverse backgrounds to share stories about what might be lost and gained through translation. Which kind of spaces support the translation of linguistic and cultural difference? And how are language(s) important in the making of place, of Read more …

Moving Tongues – History Week walking tour

Join ‘Moving Tongue’s curator Nadia Rhook and retrace the urban foot paths of Melbourne’s migrants. From the British colonists who laid the Hoddle Grid over Wurundjeri land to the nascent South Asian diaspora based around ‘Little Lon’ and the politics of love, labour and opium in Little Bourke’s Chinese Quarter, discover how Melbourne has been made Read more …

Moving Tongues: Language And Migration In 1890s Melbourne

Curated by La Trobe University’s Dr Nadia Rhook, this exhibition tells stories of migration, communication and translation in 1890s Melbourne. It co-exhibits with John Young’s acclaimed art installation 1866: The Worlds of Lowe Kong Meng and John Ah Siug.

Workers of the World

15th Biennial Labour History Conference Today, the Australian working class are workers of the world: in the sense that we are a predominantly immigrant working class (or the descendants of relatively recent immigrants); and in the sense that workers from so many of the world’s nations, languages and cultures have made their homes here. The Read more …

The Search for a New National Identity: The Rise of Multiculturalism in Canada and Australia, 1890s–1970s

Jatinder Mann’s The Search for a New National Identity: The Rise of Multiculturalism in Canada and Australia, 1890s–1970s (Peter Lang Publishing) asks a key historical question: why and how did multiculturalism replace Britishness as the defining idea of community for English-speaking Canada and Australia, and what does this say about their respective experiences of nationalism Read more …

Disabled Children and the Immigration of DP Families after WWII

An Australian Studies Research Network with Ruth Balint. This paper draws on extensive original archival research to consider a hidden history of the children left behind, in the light of recent historiography of the new humanitarianism of the postwar era, which mostly assumes that keeping the family together was a priority at all costs, and Read more …

New Lives in a New Country?

The Library holds hundreds of published recollections of migrants from non-English-speaking backgrounds. What do they tell us about the migrant experience and about Australia as a country of immigration? Do migrants’ life histories form part of Australian history? And what’s food got to do with ‘ethnic writing’? Klaus Neumann will answer these and other questions Read more …

AHA member to be 2016 Allan Martin Public Lecturer

Joy Damousi will be the 2016 Allan Martin Public Lecturer at the Australian National University in May. Allan Martin (1926–2002) was an intellectual, institutional, and social pioneer. When most Australians went to England for their postgraduate work, he chose ANU, where he was the first doctoral student in History in the Research School of Social Read more …