‘Hidden in Plain View’

Congratulations to Paul Irish. His new book, to be published in May 2017. The book shows that although they were often ignored in colonial narratives, local Aboriginal people did not lose their culture and die out within decades of Governor Phillip’s arrival in Sydney in 1788. Rather, they maintained a strong bond with the coast and its Read more …

‘Photography, Humanitarianism, Empire’

Congratulations to Jane Lydon, whose new book Photography, Humanitarianism, Empire (Bloomsbury) explores how photographs, with their power to create a sense of proximity and empathy, have long been a crucial means of exchanging ideas between people across the globe. Focusing on Australian experience in a global context, the book offers a rich selection of case studies to Read more …

Contesting Australian History: Festschrift in honour of Professor Marilyn Lake

This festschrift event is in celebration of Marilyn Lake’s scholarship and teaching and her contributions to different university communities and the Australian Historical Association, and her much valued friendship and collegiality over many years. The themes of the two day event will include: international history from an Australian perspective; histories of feminism; engaging America: US Read more …

‘The Land is Our History: Indigeneity, Law, and the Settler State’

Congratulations to Miranda Johnson on the recent publication of her book. It tells the story of Indigenous legal activism at a critical juncture in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, as these three countries sought out new postcolonial identities in the Asia-Pacific region. The book examines how Indigenous peoples opened up the space of law for the recognition Read more …

‘Gurindji Blues Postscript’

Charlie Ward, who researched the history of the Gurindji communities of Kalkaringi and Daguragu for his book, A Handful of Sand, describes his discoveries about the Gurindji Walk-off and its aftermath: official spying programs, conflicted activists, fabricated biographies and the second, failed Gurindji Walk-off from Wave Hill.

‘1787: The Lost Chapters of Australia’s Beginnings’

Nick Brodie’s new book traces the journey of Australia before 1788 to explore how ‘discovered’ the southern continent already was, by Indigenous Australians who lived there, and sailors, traders and fishermen who had visited. The book shifts the focus from post-colonial history to stories of Australia as a vast and active land participating in a Read more …

Aboriginal Trackers in NSW

New South Wales Police employed Aboriginal trackers from 1862 to 1973. Trackers used their traditional bush skills to find lost people and pursue criminals across the land. Most were employed in regional areas, but some were based in Sydney, including the Redfern horse stables. In this lecture, Dr Michael Bennett will highlight some of the Sydney trackers Read more …

This is Where They Travelled: Historical Aboriginal Lives in Sydney

An exhibition curated by NSW History Fellow (and AHA member) Paul Irish and researchers from the La Perouse Aboriginal, with free guided walking tour that debunks the assumption that Aboriginal people disappeared from Sydney in the nineteenth century, or lost their cultural links to the area. Run in conjunction with NAIDOC week.