Masters and Servants: Cultures of Empire in the Tropics

Claire Lowrie’s Masters and Servants: Cultures of Empire in the Tropics (Studies in Imperialism Series, Manchester University Press) will be launched by Ann Curthoys. Professor Curthoys will deliver a lecture ‘Looking for gender? Writing Aboriginal-settler relations into Australian political history‘, prior to the launch. RSVP Alice Knaggs by 10 June 2016.

Voyages and Visions: A Symposium in Honour of John Gascoigne and Ian Tyrrell

This celebration of the inspirational careers of two of Australia’s most eminent historians will be held 30 June to 2 July. There are a number of ways you can be involved: Cocktail Party and Keynote Address by Tom Griffiths, ‘Global Dreaming: Australia and the World’, $30 or Conference (2-day) and Cocktail Party/Tom Griffiths address: $150. Read more …

Voyages and Visions: A Symposium in Honour of John Gascoigne and Ian Tyrrell

Registrations are now open for a three day celebration of two inspirational careers. This event brings together historians from all over Australia and internationally to share ground-breaking new work on empires and exploration, cross-cultural encounters, the history of science, American exceptionalism, and social and environmental visionaries. Thursday 30 June to Saturday 2 July 2016, University Read more …

Imperial Underworld: An Escaped Convict and the Transformation of the British Colonial Order

Just published is Kirsten McKenzie’s Imperial Underworld: An Escaped Convict and the Transformation of the British Colonial Order (Cambridge University Press) which argues that the colourful and salacious aspects of colonial administrations cannot be separated from the real business of political and social change. The book instead highlights the importance of taking gossip, paranoia, factional Read more …

Masters of Empire: Great Lakes Indians and the Making of America

Michael McDonnell’s new book Masters of Empire: Great Lakes Indians and the Making of America (Macmillan) reveals the pivotal role played by the native peoples of the Great Lakes in the history of North America. Highlighting the long-standing rivalries and relationships among the great Indian nations of North America, it shows how Europeans often played Read more …

Anti-Slavery and Australia

Slavery and anti‐slavery movements have been long entwined with Australia’s politics, history, and activist campaigns, part of an international and national history that in the mid nineteenth century saw the end of the formal Atlantic slave trade but the rise of indenture and other forms of unfree labour. Anti‐slavery was, among many other things, a Read more …

Children, Childhood and Youth in the British World

Shirleene Robinson and Simon Sleight are the editors of Children, Childhood and Youth in the British World (Palgrave Macmillan). Contributors – including AHA members Shurlee Swain, Yorick Smaal, Melissa Bellanta and Kate Darian-Smith – locate children, childhood and youth in broader social contexts and acknowledge young people as historical agents, rarely operating within situations of Read more …

Indigenous Evangelists and Questions of Authority in the British Empire 1750–1945

Peggy Brock and Norman Etherington (along with Gareth Griffith and Jacqueline Van Gent) have just published  Indigenous Evangelists and Questions of Authority in the British Empire 1750–1945 (Brill). It is the first full-length historical study of indigenous evangelists across a range of societies, geographical regions and colonial regimes and the first to focus on the Read more …

Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire: New Views on Environmental History

Emily O’Gorman (with co-editors James Beattie and Edward Melillo) has just published Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire: New Views on Environmental History (Bloomsbury Publishing) which explores how networks of human and non-human actors shaped environments, cultures and societies throughout the British Empire and beyond, and how local and regional conditions transformed these densely interconnected Read more …

Restless Men: Masculinity and Robinson Crusoe, 1788-1840

Robinson Crusoe’s call to adventure and do-it-yourself settlement resonated with British explorers. In tracing the links in a discursive chain through which a particular male subjectivity was forged, Karen Downing’s Restless Men: Masculinity and Robinson Crusoe, 1788-1840 reveals how such men took their tensions with them to Australia, so that the colonies never were a solution Read more …